Communicating the Unthinkable

About

This is a blog where I share documents + artefacts from the Cold War. It focuses on British civil defence and 'domestic propaganda' from 1950-1990, with other bits thrown in from time to time.

It's written and edited by me, Taras Young. I collect this stuff. I try to post something new as often as I can, at least once a month.

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@coldwaruk

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Categories

1950s · 1970s · 1980s · Administration · Advertisement · Analysis · Booklet · Central Government · Central Office of Information · Civil Defence · Document · Emergency planning · Home Office · International · Leaflet · Local Government · Media · Military · Ministry of Defence · Postcards · Protest · Public Information · Training and Tools

Recent posts

Displaying posts tagged 'Protest'

Protest by Post – the Cold War activism of Leeds Postcards

Leeds Postcards logo

Leeds Postcards was founded in 1979, with the intention of using postcards “as a political tool and agent for change”. They quickly became well-known, producing some iconic work with activist groups such as the Medical Campaign Against Nuclear Weapons (MCANW) and CND branches across the country, and artists including Peter Kennard and Steve Bell. They are still publishing postcards today.

Throughout the 1980s, Leeds Postcards published a number of cards satirising the threat of nuclear war, and celebrating the movement against the bomb, which I’m sharing here (with their permission). I’ve quoted the text from the back of the postcards for some context, as well as the artist and date, where known.

Greetings from Nuclear Free Leeds, unknown artist, 1981

Postcard: Greetings from Nuclear Free Leeds

On 30 July 1980 Leeds City Council adopted a resolution from Councillor Michael McGowan which expressed grave concern at the build up of nuclear weapons and agreed to contact other cities about action against the nuclear threat.

On 24 June 1981 Leeds became a Nuclear Free Zone. the City Council promotes peace education and peace exhibitions, and published Leeds and the Bomb to inform the public of the effects of a nuclear strike on Leeds.

Leeds Postcards had a national (or international) outlook; their name came from the fact that they were based in Leeds. This postcard is one of the few that is actually about Leeds.

One of the growing number of ‘Nuclear Free’ local authorities at this time, Leeds City Council was particularly active in publishing booklets and pamphlets such as Leeds and the Bomb, Leeds and Bradford Under a Cloud and Hazards of Nuclear Transport. I’ll cover these in future blog posts.

Continue reading →

ONDG – So You Think You’re Safe?

This early 1980s protest flyer was handed out by members of Oswestry Nuclear Disarmament Group (ONDG).

Oswestry, found in Shropshire near the Welsh border, was under threat because of the nearby Criggion Radio Station. Criggion transmitted messages to British nuclear submarines, making it a potential target for attack in a war with the USSR.

As well as providing anti-nuclear viewpoints and information, the leaflet acted as a recruitment tool for new members for ONDG.

Possible targets in and around London

For #LondonHistoryDay, here’s a very special map of London. Produced by the Greater London Council (GLC) in 1985, it shows potential targets for Soviet nuclear weapons. You can click the map above to zoom in.

The GLC – whose nuclear policy team are shown below in 1985 – were vociferous opponents of the UK government’s views on Civil Defence. This map was created as part of a whole host of materials making their case. I’ll cover more bits and pieces from GLC in future posts.

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